Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

Actions
Loading...
  • Amphora

    Technique:
    cast, embossed and chased
    Dimensions:
    h. 42,5 cm

Amphora

Created: Moldavia (now Romania). 4th century

Found: Village of Kontseshty, right bank of the River Prut, found in 1812

This amphora was intended for wine. The surface of its body is divided into three friezes by ornamental bands. The upper frieze shows hunting scenes, the central one - battle scenes of Greek warriors with the Amazons, and the lower frieze presents three Nereids floating on fabulous animals with fish tails and the bodies of a tiger, a horse and an ibex. The friezes are skilfully executed in a manner typical of the Graeco-Roman art distinguished for its dynamic compositions and expressive images. The subjects and their detailed treatment, as well as the form of the vessel, are typical of Greek art. However, it was produced in the early Byzantine era and to a certain extent reflects the culture of Byzantium, which is clearly seen in some decorative motifs and details of the form. The amphora was found in the rich burial of a barbarian chief. It is attributed to the time when the Huns dominated the Eastern Europe.

Title:

Amphora

Date:

Material:

Technique:

cast, embossed and chased

Dimensions:

h. 42,5 cm

Acquisition date:

Entered the Hermitage in 1814; transferred from the Imperial Household Office

Inventory Number:

2160-1

User collections including this work of art: