• Tapestry: The Battle between the Sabines and Romans

    Technique:
    tapestry
    Dimensions:
    313x408 cm

Tapestry: The Battle between the Sabines and Romans

France, first quater of the 17th century

In the 17th century, French tapestry production flourished once more, French masters successfully competing with masters from Flanders (which in the 16th century had been the main centre for the production of tapestries). A major role in the development of French tapestry production was played by the patronage of French kings, particularly Henri IV, who organized a tapestry workshop in Paris, which from 1606 were located in the recently expanded galleries of the Louvre. The series of the Rape of the Sabine Women, from which this tapestry comes, was clearly copied from a Brussels series of the same name which was based on sketches by Giulio Romano. It shows the Sabine women entering the fray, seeking to stop the battle and make peace between their menfolk and the Romans. In terms of composition and the three-dimensional treatment of figures, this tapestry seeks to imitate painting, a tendency characteristic of the period. The arabesques of the border are filled with swans, doves, putti, plant scrolls and female masks along the edges. This matches the borders on tapestries showing the Story of Psyche produced to cartoons by Raphael and woven in the workshops of the Louvre galleries during the first quarter of the 17th century. It is possible that the Hermitage tapestry was also produced in those workshops.

Title:

Tapestry: The Battle between the Sabines and Romans

Place of creation:

School:

Material:

Technique:

tapestry

Dimensions:

313x408 cm

Acquisition date:

Handed over from the former Museum of the Decorative and Applied Arts (the Central School of Technical Drawing of Baron A. L. Shtieglitz)

Inventory Number:

Т-15624

Collection:

Subcollection:

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