• The Lamentation

    Artist:
    Bellange, Jacques-Charles, ca. 1575-1616
    Technique:
    oil
    Dimensions:
    116,3x173 cm

Bellange, Jacques-Charles, ca. 1575-1616

The Lamentation

France, 1616-1617

Only a few works by Jacques Bellange, founder of the Lotharingian school of painting, have survived, as most of his works were destroyed during religious wars in France at the end of the 16th century. The work of the French painter, draughtsman and engraver Jacques Bellange is connected with Nancy, the capital of Lotharingia. Being a court painter to the Dukes Charles III and Henry II in 1602-1616, he performed decorative work, painted portraits as well as created compositions on historical and religious subjects. Bellange’s work evolved from exquisite early works to the deep tragedy of later works. The Hermitage painting “The Lamentation” belongs to the last group. The striking contrast between the dark background and the illuminated parts of white drapery on Christ’s body heightens the emotional intensity of the scene. The faces in the background slightly outlined by flickering candles seem nearly unreal. The cold, gloomy colour scheme is enlivened by blue touches in Christ's shroud and contrasts with the warm yellow flame of the candle, which gives the painting the note of tragedy and disturbance so characteristic of the artist's late works. The figure to the right is probably the donor for whom the work was painted. In showing the individual appearance of the donor, Bellange revealed his skill as a portraitist. The combination of a religious them with a rather more secular portrait indicates one of the characteristic points in French art of the late 16th and early 17th century.

Title:

The Lamentation

Place:

Date:

Material:

Technique:

oil

Dimensions:

116,3x173 cm

Acquisition date:

Entered the Hermitage in 1967; purchased from a private person

Inventory Number:

ГЭ-10032

Category:

Collection:

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